The psychology of persuasion, part 4: Liking
Sam Willet gravatar avitar

The psychology of persuasion, part 4: Liking

Author: Sam Willet | Posted on: 30 September 2016

Liking is the fourth of six principles of persuasion set out by marketing expert Robert Cialdini in his book Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.

So, in this part of the 1-minute content marketer, Robin talks about how evidence has shown that being liked by your prospects makes them more likely to do business with you. It sounds simple, but making an effort to find common ground in the early stages of a business relationship could be very beneficial in the long term.

If you enjoy the video, please share it.

In the last episode, Robin talked about the how people like to stick to their decisions once they commit to them. Watch it here:

The psychology of persuasion, part 3: Commitment and consistency


Author: Sam Willet

Sam Willet gravatar avitar
Sam is a Producer and Client Manager at Ember Television. He has worked in online media since graduating with an MA in Film and TV from the University of Birmingham, and loves a good human interest story. You can contact him at [email protected] https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=294919697&authType=name&authToken=k-zK&trk=prof-proj-cc-name https://twitter.com/ember_samw
The psychology of persuasion, part 4: Liking

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