Changing perceptions: Women in engineering

Changing perceptions: Women in engineering

Posted on: 28 April 2016

The UK engineering sector is currently experiencing a major skills shortage.

According to Engineering UK's 2016 report State of Engineering, this shortfall is causing a rise in operating costs and delays to the development of new products and services.

The report recognises that one solution is to encourage more women into the sector, stating that "if women were to participate more fully in STEM employment, it could contribute an additional £2 billion to the economy."

Birmingham City University recognises that to get more women into engineering involves changing the perception of engineers wearing blue overalls covered in oil.

In this video, Mechanical Engineering graduate Katja speaks about her experience of working as a Technical Communications Engineer at Siemens. She talks enthusiastically about the variety of work in her role, supportive colleagues and her hopes for the future in what she believes is a career full of opportunity.

Click the link below to read the report:

Engineering UK Report 2016

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Changing perceptions: Women in engineering

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