marketing live events Think with Google: Lifting the curtain on Live Events
Video and smartphones key to marketing live events, study shows

Video and smartphones key to marketing live events, study shows

Posted on: 12 August 2014

Smartphone at a live event

Google’s latest research, in association with Ipsos MediaCT, sheds light on current trends in the world of live events, and not just the sharp rise in interest. The study focuses on the consumer path, from awareness through to engagement, charting how attendees use different media when choosing, booking and responding to their live event, and there’s something for businesses and marketing executives alike to learn every step of the way.

One of the most important findings of the study is that 25% of people who viewed online video when researching live events said that it had an effect on their final decision. This means that video is more influential than search engines, social media, and even the ticketing websites themselves, showing just how much attention online video commands. Unlike all those other information outlets, video actually changes people’s minds, making it extremely powerful to marketing executives and small startups putting on events for clients and building audiences.

In addition, smartphones and mobile devices seem to be the success story of the study, featuring in most stages of the consumer path, from initial research right down to 66% of the audience who check-in, comment and like the event as it happens on social media and other mobile sites. This smartphone revolution is closely linked to the engagement with online video, as it’s here that most people are accessing that video.

Google’s latest research clearly has plenty of takeaways for anyone in the marketing or live event industries, the most impressive of which being the sharp increase in smartphone use. Google reports a 200% increase in the number of people buying tickets on smartphones since 2012 and that figure is set to increase massively over the next few years. Mobile is making a grand entrance in the marketing world and it’s here to stay. Similarly, online video emerges as the victor in the influence stakes. Beating social media and search engines when it comes to affecting consumers’ decisions makes video a powerful marketing tool, and one that can’t be ignored by any industry. The findings about engagement during an event are also interesting, showing that social media really is ever-present in every sphere, so creating a social media presence for your event or business is crucial to facilitate real time engagement and boost sales.

If the infographic shows anything though, it’s the importance of combined formats and channels for sales. Although online video is the most influential format, you still need to consider social media, search engines and printed matter if you’re going to reach the widest possible audience. You also need to keep your finger on the pulse; the rapid growth of mobile in the past two years shows how quickly and drastically trends change. If you want to stay visible and competitive, you’ll need to be ahead of the game with your marketing campaign.

The full findings from the report are available at Think with Google.


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Video and smartphones key to marketing live events, study shows

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